What did you think of the show?

No Two Thumbs UpTis the season for pre-Tony Spring openings on Broadway. The opening nights are coming fast and furiously and the theater district street corners and watering holes are echoing with that all important question, “So, what did you think of the show?”

The default response is usually something like, “I liked it.” Or, “I didn’t like it.

However, I no longer find that to be an acceptable response. It assumes too much and isn’t very useful to the person posing the question. Here’s why…

I liked it!” could actually mean a million things such as:
“It was the best show I’ve ever seen.”
“My best friend wrote it.”
“It exceeded my expectations.”

And

I didn’t like it.” could actually mean:
“The show was good but I don’t like musicals/plays/farces/avante garde/etc.”
“The theater was too hot/cold/uncomfortable.”
“The show was actually bad.”

As industry insiders (and if you read this blog I can assume you are one), we attend more theater than most people . Our friends and colleagues count on us to inform their theater going activities.

We owe it both to the people who put their efforts into the shows we’ve seen as well as our advice-seeking friends to be conscientious, informed representatives of our theater community. That means, not copping out with a useless, non-descript: “I liked it or didn’t like it” response, but actually giving them information that they can use.

In other words, next time someone asks you, “What did you THINK of the show?” Please put some actual THOUGHT into your answer.

One Response to What did you think of the show?

  1. Roy O'Neil says:

    Maybe the Questioner might start with less open ended inquiry. Was it too long for you? Did you get the joke in scene 3? Who was your favorite character?

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